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Posts Tagged ‘ literature ’

Proletarian Cromwell – A Labour History Essay

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May 17, 2017
Proletarian Cromwell – A Labour History Essay

Canadian labour historians have often cited politically inspired poems to portray first-hand the misery of the workplace, the poverty experienced by working families, the inequality perpetrated by the capitalist system, or to describe the agency of the working class in seeking justice against those who exercise hegemony over them. But few have been inclined...
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Graphic history reaches new audiences

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July 1, 2014

Graphic History Collective, May Day: A Graphic History of Protest (Toronto: Between the Lines, 2012), 32 pages (paper), no price given. One of the many often unfulfilled goals of the modern trade union movement has been to find ways to reach out to young people in hopes of replenishing the diminishing ranks of an...
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Labour History Sings – A Conference Report

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May 6, 2013
Labour History Sings – A Conference Report

The Pacific Northwest Labour History Association (PNLHA) held its 45th annual conference May 3-5, 2013, in Portland, Oregon, and like other years there was a wide variety of topics as well as styles of presentation. I was on the planning committee and made two presentations during the conference, so I am clearly not an...
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The Smelter Poets – A History Essay

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April 23, 2013
The Smelter Poets – A History Essay

Abstract When celebrated Wobbly troubadour Joe Hill purportedly visited the Rossland Miners’ Hall in the early 1900s to lend his support to the first Canadian local of the rugged Western Federation of Miners (WFM), he no doubt shared some of his inspired verses with the mine workers who are said to have protected him. Claims...
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Where does it all begin?

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November 27, 2012
Where does it all begin?

Novelist Louis de Bernieres, perhaps best known for his book Captain Corelli’s Mandolin, has a somewhat depressing view of history. Unfortunately it seems to ring rather true when applied to today’s messy murderous world. “History has no beginnings, for everything that happens becomes the cause or pretext for what occurs afterwards, and this chain...
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Richard Ford’s Canada – A Book Review

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August 8, 2012
Richard Ford’s Canada – A Book Review

Richard Ford, Canada (New York: HarperCollins, 2012), 420 pages, $27.95 (hard cover) Canadians with advance news of Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Ford’s latest novel, Canada, might have been expecting more than he was prepared to deliver about their home and native land. Indeed, Ford forces readers to wade through almost 200 pages before Canada...
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The Smelter Poets – A History Essay (Updated)

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June 4, 2012
The Smelter Poets – A History Essay (Updated)

When celebrated Wobbly troubadour Joe Hill purportedly visited the Rossland Miners’ Hall in the early 1900s to lend his support to the first Canadian local of the rugged Western Federation of Miners (WFM), he no doubt shared some of his inspired verses with the mine workers who are said to have protected him. Claims...
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Remembering Allende

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April 4, 2012
Remembering Allende

Isabel Allende’s much celebrated 1982 novel The House of the Spirits was a wonderful read full of angst and sorry, pain, anger and frustration. It joins the great Latin American magical realist tradition while offering a credible depiction of the horrors of early 1970s Chile and the overthrow and assassination of Marxist president Salvador...
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San Francisco night

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January 28, 2011
San Francisco night

John’s Grill. It doesn’t sound “historic”. Doesn’t even sound interesting. Of all the gin joints and chop shops in San Francisco, why pick this one for a late-night martini? Because this is where writer Dashiell Hammett hung out back in the 1920s. That’s right. Dash himself had lunch here regularly. Yes, the same Dash...
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Barney’s Version

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January 19, 2011
Barney’s Version

The late Montreal writer Mordecai Richler gave us many characters that reveal both the comedy and the tragedy of human relationships, but Barney Padovsky is perhaps the novelist’s crowning achievement in that regard with this masterful creation of a schmuck of schmucks.
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