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Posts Tagged ‘ labour ’

The Innocence of Joe Hill – A Radio Labour podcast

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December 5, 2011
The Innocence of Joe Hill – A Radio Labour podcast

Since he was shot by a Utah firing squad on November 19, 1915, people have debated the guilt or innocence of storied protest singer-songwriter Joe Hill. Now, with The Man Who Never Died, a new book by William M. Adler, published by Bloomsbury in New York, we finally have the answer. The innocence of...
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“New Labour History” pioneer dies

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December 5, 2011
“New Labour History” pioneer dies

David Montgomery, the well-respected American labour historian blacklisted as a union organizer in the 1950s, died on Dec. 2, 2011. A founder of what became known in the 1970s as the New Labour History, Montgomery is perhaps best known for his 1987 book The Fall of the House of Labor, a critical appraisal of...
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Lefty’s Legacy, Margaret’s Hope – A Feature Article

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November 14, 2011
Lefty’s Legacy, Margaret’s Hope – A Feature Article

SFU alumna Margaret Morgan (MA’76) and her husband, left-wing radical Richard Ernest “Lefty” Morgan, were life-long learners, educators, and activists, so it seems appropriate that SFU’s research centre for labour studies should be named the Morgan Centre for Labour Studies. Many alumni from SFU’s “bad old days” in the late 1960s would probably agree...
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The Innocence of Joe Hill

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October 28, 2011
The Innocence of Joe Hill

William M. Adler, The Man Who Never Died: The Life, Times and Legacy of Joe Hill, American Labor Icon (New York: Bloomsbury, 2011). Since he was shot by a Utah firing squad on November 19, 1915, people have debated the guilt or innocence of storied protest songwriter and singer Joe Hill. Now, with a...
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Red Seattle – A travel essay

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August 7, 2011
Red Seattle – A travel essay

An old episode of Frasier, the television comedy set in Seattle, focuses on an impending strike at the fictional radio station where Frasier works as an on-air psychiatrist. Whether the script writers knew it or not, they were tapping into the radical history of a city that has the dubious or proud distinction of...
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Mine-Mill’s Peace Arch Concerts – A history essay

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July 25, 2011
Mine-Mill’s Peace Arch Concerts – A history essay

When Harvey Murphy, the pugnacious western regional director of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, learned that his friend and fellow leftist, American opera star Paul Robeson, was not going to be allowed to cross the Canada-United States border to sing at the Vancouver Mine-Mill convention on February 1, 1952, he...
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‘A Better Way for Oregon’ – A photo essay

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May 21, 2011
‘A Better Way for Oregon’ – A photo essay

Public sector workers employed in education, health care and other services funded by the Oregon state government stood up for fairness at a rally in Salem, the state capital, on May 20, 2011. About 3,000 workers and their families chanted “Hey, hey, what do we say/We say there’s a better” and “What do we...
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Triangle Shirt Waist Fire killed 146

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March 25, 2011
Triangle Shirt Waist Fire killed 146

Today, March 25, marks the 100th anniversary of the tragic Triangle Shirt Waist Factory fire in New York City that led to mass protests and some modest changes that were designed to create safer work conditions. The workplace tragedy killed 146 workers, many of them immigrant Jewish and Italian women, two only 14 years...
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Boost, boom and ‘kaboom’ – A history essay

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March 5, 2011

Few Canadians will have heard of the infamous Ludlow Massacre, a “slaughter of the innocents” at a workers’ tent city in the coalfields of Colorado in the spring of 1914. Fewer still will know that in the footnotes to that show of corporate bullying against miners and their families a familiar name pops up,...
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Madness in Madison

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February 26, 2011
Madness in Madison

Now they’ve done it. The Wisconsin legislature has gone and passed their anti-union bill. It’s a crazy place, America, and it’s getting crazier by the minute. But turning on its public employees – the very people who make life slightly more liveable – is about the craziest move yet. What’s going on here?
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